Pesticides

“A Who's Who of pesticides is therefore of concern to us all. If we are going to live so intimately with these chemicals eating and drinking them, taking them into the very marrow of our bones - we had better know something about their nature and their power.”  – Rachel Carson, Silent Spring
From the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS):

 

A pesticide is any substance used to kill, repel, or control certain forms of plant or animal life that are considered to be pests. Pesticides include herbicides for destroying weeds and other unwanted vegetation, insecticides for controlling a wide variety of insects, fungicides used to prevent the growth of molds and mildew, disinfectants for preventing the spread of bacteria, and compounds used to control mice and rats. Because of the widespread use of agricultural chemicals in food production, people are exposed to low levels of pesticide residues through their diets. Scientists do not yet have a clear understanding of the health effects of these pesticide residues. Results from the Agricultural Health Study, an ongoing study of pesticide exposures in farm families, show that farmers who used agricultural insecticides experienced an increase in headaches, fatigue, insomnia, dizziness, hand tremors, and other neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that children are particularly susceptible to adverse effects from exposure to pesticides, including neurodevelopmental effects. People may also be exposed to pesticides used in a variety of settings including homes, schools, hospitals, and workplaces.

 

Pesticide Action Network North America (PAN North America, or PANNA) works to replace the use of hazardous pesticides with ecologically sound and socially just alternatives. As one of five PAN Regional Centers worldwide, we link local and international consumer, labor, health, environment and agriculture groups into an international citizens’ action network. This network challenges the global proliferation of pesticides, defends basic rights to health and environmental quality, and works to ensure the transition to a just and viable society.

The Sierra Club, a non-profit organization, is the nation’s longest standing volunteer driven environmental organization. Its purpose is to ‘explore, enjoy and protect the planet’. It does this by educating the public and influencing public policy decisions — legislative, legal, and electoral.

 

Please note that donations and dues for these policy efforts need to meet specific standards to be tax deductible. Donations to the Sierra Club Foundation are 501c3 tax deductible. Locally the Sierra Club Long Island Group is advocating for climate change resilient strategies with the legal Article 78 case for the Hempstead Lake State Park project within the Mill River Watershed. In this case donations are tax deductible:

Effective September 1, 2020 - August 31, 2023

Sierra Club Foundation 2101 Webster Street, Suite 1250 Oakland, CA 94612
Checks should be made out to Sierra Club Foundation  with Long Island Hempstead Lake State Park in the memo line. 


Copyright 2020 by Sierra Club Long Island Group

  • Facebook Social Icon